What are YOUR clubhouse rules?

Successful entrepreneurs are choosy about their clients.Back in the old days, children would create clubhouses for themselves and their special friends.  Membership was by invitation only, and—depending on who “owned” the clubhouse—highly coveted.

In a way, things are not that different today for adults who have become successful entrepreneurs.  The scrap-wood-and-tar-paper clubhouse may have become a brick-and-mortar storefront or a virtual place of business, but one thing hasn’t changed: Business owners who do the best job of serving their clients and creating a gratifying business for themselves know that not everyone gets to become a member of their clubhouse.

Why is that?  Why does it make sense to intentionally exclude some people from your pool of prospective clients? Several reasons:

What all that means is that you get to identify and stick to selection criteria as a way of creating the client base that grows a business you can really enjoy.  To give you an idea what I mean, check out some of the rules for playing in my clubhouse.

  1. You take responsibility for your results, but you don’t beat up on yourself when those results are not what you wanted.
     
  2. While you occasionally get bummed out, you typically come from a place of positive self-talk and positive expectation.
     
  3. You’re curious and willing to explore new ideas.
     
  4. You can’t remember the last time you said, “Yes, but…..
     
  5. You don’t spend money like a drunken sailor, but you do willingly invest in resources that provide tools or resources you currently lack.

 

So what about you?  Have you identified the demographic and psychographic characteristics of people you’ll allow into your clubhouse?  Let us know what they are; we might want to adopt some of them ourselves!

 

By the way, thanks to studiobeerhorst-bbmarie for posting her image in the Creative Commons section of Flickr.

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6 Responses to What are YOUR clubhouse rules?

  1. From one Kathleen to another, as usual you have hit the nail squarely on the head. Keep up the good blogging. We miss seeing your warm smiling up here in the cold tundra 🙂

    • Kathleen Mavity Kathleen says:

      So good to hear from you, sister Kathleen! Thanks for the kudos on the blogging; it’s so energizing to read these comments and know that people are actually reading and benefiting from my work. As for the tundra, we seem to have brought it with us – lots of below-zero nights lately. What’s with that?!? :0

  2. I love this! I had some fears that clearly defining my ideal clients would limit who I can work with. Exactly the opposite – I have more inquiries, and I also get better results since I know the type of woman that gets the best results from my Fertility in Bloom program, and I speak directly and exclusively to them!

    • Kathleen Mavity Kathleen says:

      It seems to me that so much of being a successful entrepreneur involves a willingness to move forward in faith, Dorothy, just as you did. Wasn’t it John Paul Jones who said “Fortune favors the bold”? I love stories like yours that make his point!

  3. Susannah says:

    I love this Kathleen. I “let go” of a client yesterday. We were doing ok, but it just didn’t feel like a great fit, and his work was inconsistent. And he constantly wanted a better “deal.” The clearer I get about EXACTLY the kind of clients I love working with, the better results I am able to help them achieve – and it takes WAY less energy and “stress!”

    • Kathleen Mavity Kathleen says:

      Love, love, love that story, Susannah! Why should any of us have to suffer to earn a living by working with pain-in-the-neck clients? It’s so energizing to hear that people who are brave enough to draw appropriate lines in the sand enjoy the rewards of their courage. Woohoo to you!

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